“The issue today is the same as it has been throughout all history, whether people shall be allowed to govern themselves or be ruled by a small elite.”

–Thomas Jefferson

The Signature Requirement for Alderman is Most Likely Unconstitutional

Here we go again. In 2003 Patricia McAllister, Paul Jakes Jr., and Joseph McAfee were on the ballot for mayor although they did not meet the state mandated signature requirement. After a lawsuit was filed, the Chicago Board of Elections said the state legislature erred in requiring 25,000 signatures for mayoral ballot access. The CBOE allowed all three candidates the honor of having incumbent Mayor Richard M. Daley crush them at the polls. The same thing could happen again this year because Illinois state legislators made foolish errors when they increased the signature requirement to run for alderman. To read more, click here.

Keep the Shakman Monitor

Federal Court Judge Wayne Andersen assigned an officer of the court to monitor City of Chicago personnel after the FBI uncovered and stopped a 16 year job and election rigging scheme during the administration of Mayor Richard M. Daley. Jay Stone is one of three Shakman award winners who will be allowed to speak during the June 16, 2014 federal court hearing. Candidates and voters are worse off today then when the Shakman Accord was signed to protect them. Mayor Rahm Emanuel had the support of Chicago’s illegal patronage workers when he won his election to the U.S. Congress. Stone argues that is wrong for Rahm Emanuel to use the removal of the Shakman monitor to benefit his 2015 reelection campaign while Emanuel’s actions were just cause for the appointment of the Shakman monitor in the first place. To read the objections Stone filed in federal court, click here.

How the Chicago Machine Renders Voters Irrelevant

On election day Chicago voters were of no consequence in 90% of the state senate races, 78% of the state representative elections, and 100% of the races for Cook County judge because only one candidate was on the ballot. To learn how the Chicago machine has tampered with election laws to eliminate its political competition, click here.

Don’t Get Fooled Again

90% of IL State Senate Candidates Under the CBOE Authority are Running Unopposed

78% of Illinois State Representative Candidates Don’t have Opposition. The Illinois legislature and the CBOE picked the majority of state senators and state representatives instead of the voters. To read more, click here.  

The Chicago Way: Deny Voters a Choice at the Polls

In 200 state legislative elections between 2004 and 2010, 60% of the machine’s candidates ran unopposed because Springfield legislative leaders from Chicago pushed through election laws to eliminate their competition. To read more about the practice of denying voters’ their option and civil rights to vote for non-machine candidates, click here.

Obama’s Win at all Cost Strategy Violated His Four 1996 State Senate Opponent’s Civil Rights

Two of Obama’s state senate challengers were so outraged, they filed federal court lawsuits. Another opponent never forgot Obama’s mistreatment of her; she was a Hillary Clinton delegate at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. This article contains new information and analysis of the Chicago Board of Elections refusal to let Obama’s four challengers on the ballot. To read more, click here.

Did President Obama Tamper with his Former White House Chief of Staff’s Election?

You can decide whether a Chicago election commissioner’s 10 hour White House visit nine days before ruling in favor of Rahm Emanuel involved tampering by reading this.

Election Commissioner Removal Sought

Read how Langdon Neal cashed in on his election commissioner contacts and relationships for over $100 million by clicking here

Emanuel’s Involvement in Two Chicago Scandals Costs Taxpayers $184 Million

Up to 250 city workers unlawfully campaigned for Emanuel when Emanuel won his seat in Congress. What makes taxpayers footing the bill for Emanuel’s campaign workers worse, Emanuel earned $16.2 million in the 16 months prior to him running for Congress. Will a Federal Court judge require Emanuel to testify before the judge removes the Shakman Monitor? To read more click this link.

Jay Stone for the People of Chicago

Why TIFs Suck Up Your Taxes

Jay Stone may have been the first Chicago candidate to challenge the feasibility of TIF districts when he ran for alderman in 2003 (see video below). According to Jay, you pay more money for real estate taxes and rent because politicians purposely designed TIFs to  increase your real estate taxes to pay for development and subsides within TIF districts. The term, “tax increment financing” is government doublespeak for “tax increases.” Jay will overhaul TIFs. In this economy and real estate market, TIFs are doing much greater harm than good.

Jay’s Campaign at a Glance

1. Campaign Contribution Limits: During Jay’s March 5, 2009 Illinois Reform Commission testimony, Jay proposed two campaign contribution laws that passed the Illinois General Assembly and were signed by Governor Pat Quinn. Starting January 1, 2011, Chicago will have its first campaign contribution limits of $5,000.00 for individuals and $10,000.00 for companies thanks in part to Jay.

2. Ballot Access: Compared to other cities, Chicago currently requires at least 10 to 25 times the number of signatures to run for mayor, city clerk, city treasurer, and alderman. Jay is campaigning for greater ballot access to encourage more civic-minded citizens to run for office. The Chicago political machine uses onerous ballot access as it’s front line defense to defeat candidates who want to change the system.

3. Ban Pay to Play Campaign Contributions: Pay to play describes campaign contributors donating money to the mayor or alderman and the mayor or alderman using their influence to help their campaign contributors receive city contracts or service. Campaign contributors are awarded city business, rezoning approvals, TIF subsidies, etc. from the very same politicians who accepted their campaign donations. Several states have already outlawed pay to play. Jay’s says Chicago can no longer afford the pay to play politics because it is an incentive for the mayor and aldermen to waste tax dollars.

4. Transparency: You have the right to know what your local government is doing with your tax dollars. The city purposely makes it difficult for individuals, watch dog groups, and journalists to find information. Jay wants to make the city’s data bases searchable, which will make information available to users in seconds or less. See for yourself. Search Los Angeles’ city council records from the present to 1979 and then compare your search to Chicago which only allows users to review records for one month. You can search 372 months of Los Angeles’ city council records at one time while you can only search one month of Chicago city council records at a time.

5. Modernized Record Keeping System: Chicago still uses the same record keeping system that it did in the 1920s. You can compare for yourself a 1920 “Chicago City Council of Journal Proceedings” with one from 2010 by visiting the Chicago Municipal Library located in the Harold Washington Public Library. A 1920 and 2010 “Chicago City Council Journal of Proceedings” look almost identical.

Chicago doesn’t number its ordinances, which every major city and state practices. The failure to number ordinances makes it extremely difficult for individuals, watch dog groups, and journalists to track ordinances between city council committees and the city council floor. Jay will number ordinances so anybody at anytime can know what your city government is doing. By knowing what is happening in city council committees and the city council floor, we can stop corruption at its inception instead of waiting 6 months to two years to read about it in the newspapers.

6. Direct Democracy; Recall of Mayor, City Clerk, City Treasurer, or Alderman: Direct democracy allows citizens like you to vote directly on issues instead of your representatives voting for you. Jay supports direct democracy, especially the use of recalls in which voters can decide to remove the mayor, city clerk, city treasurer, or alderman for misconduct in office, incompetence, or failure to perform prescribed duties. The threat of a recall makes public officials more likely to follow the will of their constituents. Also, with the power of recall, citizens can remove an incompetent or corrupt public official without having to wait until the official’s term ends.

7. Direct Democracy; Referendum: Instead of the mayor or aldermen having the sole power to make significant decisions, referendums allow voters to accept or reject proposals. Chicago residents would have benefited if referendums were used in the past. Referendums could have allowed voters to decide whether or not to lease the parking meters, the Chicago Skyway, or Midway Airport. It would have been nice if a referendum decided whether or not Chicago pursued a 2016 Olympics.

Jay fully supports giving more power to the voters who have to pay for and live with the major decisions of the mayor and Chicago city council. It was a 1982 ballot initiative that allowed voters to decide on reducing the number of state representatives from 177 to 118 members. Would you like the right to vote on reducing the number of aldermen from 50 to 15? Elect Jay and he will fight for your direct democracy right.

8. Political Competition: Jay is all about making the elections for mayor, city clerk, city treasurer, and aldermen more competitive. Jay’s proposals of campaign contribution limits, ballot access, and ban on pay to play campaign contributions take away the advantages that Chicago incumbents have used to squash their political opponents. Research shows that candidates tend to have more education, ties to the community, and income in hotly contested political races. Our city government will improve to the degree that competitive elections allow more qualified candidates to run and hold public office.

9. Accountability:  If you work for an employer, you are accountable to your boss for your job performance. If you own a business, you are accountable to your customers. If your job performance was consistently substandard, your boss or customers would fire you. Jay says the mayor and aldermen should be held accountable for their job performance just like you are. Jay’s recall proposal is one direct way you can hold your elected officials accountable. Transparent city government and modernized record keeping provide you and the media with information that is necessary to evaluate whether or not your elected representatives are doing their jobs.

When you vote on February 22, 2011, make sure you hold Mayor Daley accountable for the parking meter lease, the $40 million a year Hired Truck scandal, and the $172 million job rigging scheme. If you neither want to hold Mayor Daley responsible for the lost parking meter revenue, nor hold Mayor Daley accountable for the Hired Truck and job rigging schemes, than vote for Daley.  If not, vote for Jay Stone.

10. Good, Economical, and Efficient Government: Chicago will prosper when we elect honest public officials whose primary focus is to serve the constituents who elected them. We can fix the budget, crime, and education problems once we have fixed the problem of how we elect our representatives. The key to economic, efficient, and good government is accountability, political competition, and transparency. Jay acknowledges Chicago needs people like you to directly vote on key issues through referendums and recalls. For too long the mayor of Chicago has used a top down managerial style. For Chicago to move forward, we need an opposite approach. Jay pledges to have an inclusive administration that uses consensus and participation from Chicago’s greater resource, its people. Indeed, Chicago is a great place to live and work, but together we can make Chicago even better.

Jay Stone has the Knowledge and Ability to Lead Chicago